Joost Oppenheim, M.D., Laboratory Chief - NCI, to give Keynote Presentation at GTCbio's 8th Cytokine


Joost Oppenheim, Laboratory Chief at the Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation - NCI Frederick, is to give a keynote presentation on a group of structurally diverse multifunctional host proteins called "alarmins", at GTCbio's 8th Cytokines & inflammation Conference on January 28-29, 2010 in San Diego, CA.


[USPRwire, Wed Nov 04 2009] Joost Oppenheim, Laboratory Chief at the Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation - NCI Frederick, is to give a keynote presentation on a group of structurally diverse multifunctional host proteins called "alarmins", at
GTCbio's 8th Cytokines & inflammation Conference on January 28-29, 2010 in San Diego, CA.

Dr. Oppenheims presentation concerns recent studie that have identified a group of structurally diverse multifunctional host proteins that are rapidly released following pathogens challenge or cell injury and most importantly, are able to both chemotactically recruit and activate dendritic antigen-presenting cells.
These potent immunostimulants, including defensins, cathelicidin (LL37), eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), lactoferrin (LF), granulysin, high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) and HMGN1 serve as early warning signals to activate innate and adaptive immune systems. They interact with chemokine-like receptors and activating receptors on host cells. For example, some beta defensins, LL37, HMGB1 and EDN mimic chemokine and cytokine activities by interacting with CCR6, FPRL-1, RAGE and Toll-like receptors (TLR2) respectively. These proteins
also are antimicrobial peptides (AMP's) and are constitutively produced and released by leukocytes, but can also be induced by injurious stimulants and cytokines. In addition they are produced by keratinocytes and epithelial cells
lining the GI, GU and tracheobronchial tree. These AMP's all induce the maturation of myeloid dendritic cells and have in vivo immunoadjuvant effects. Dr. Oppenheim has highlighted the unique activities of these proteins by
classifying them as "alarmins", in injurious danger signals. This work is supported by the Intramural Program of the NIH, NCI.

Dr. Oppenheim obtained his M.D. degree from the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, trained as a clinical associate at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Bethesda, Maryland, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Birmingham, Endland, in immunology. He returned to the National Institute of Dental Research and subsequently headed the Section of Cellular Immunology there and since 1983, has been head of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation, NCI-Frederick.

Company: GTCbio


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